22 Incredible Stops on the Cabot Trail in Nova Scotia

The Cabot Trail is one of Canada’s ultimate scenic highways. Located on Nova Scotia’s Cape Breton Island, the Cabot Trail is a 298 km (185 miles) scenic drive through Cape Breton Highland’s National Park and the Atlantic Coast. It is considered one of the best road trips in the world.

We drove the Cabot Trail in a counter clockwise direction starting in Baddeck and ending in Cheticamp. The Cabot Trail can be driven in a day but we recommend four days to really explore everything there is to see and do.

Cabot Trail Stops Map

map of stops on the cabot trails
Click here for your map of all the stops on the Cabot Trail

Make sure to give plenty of time to see all the sights. There is a lot to see and do on the Cabot Trail including spectacular coastal hiking trails, cultural experiences, and great adventures. So, are you ready to explore the best stops on the Cabot Trail? Let’s go!

Cabot Trail Stops You Cannot Miss

Driving the Cabot Trail in Nova Scotia

These are the stops along the Cabot Trail in order as we saw them driving counterclockwise from Baddeck to Cheticamp.

We set off from Halifax early one morning to spend five days exploring the famed coastal. After the nearly four-hour drive north from Halifax, our Cabot Trail road trip started in the town of Baddeck where we continued in a counter-clockwise direction. The next few days were spent exploring the entire loop through the Northern half of Cape Breton Island.

1. Baddeck

Baddeck Cape Breton Cabot Trail Nova Scotia
Baddeck Nova Scotia. Home to Alexander Graham Bell.

Baddeck was the summer home to Alexander Graham Bell and there is an excellent museum built on the site of his cottage named “Beinn Bhreagh”, Gaelic for “Beautiful Mountain.”

It’s an excellent history lesson of not only the invention of the telephone but other achievements by Bell. He was an avid inventor working on everything including the first aircraft to fly in the Commonwealth (it also flew farther than the Wright Brothers).

He also developed many medical machines including the iron lung to help polio patients breathe and he developed techniques for the hearing impaired, becoming good friends with Helen Keller. Alexander Graham Bell also founded the National Geographic Society.

2. The Uisge Ban

Uisge Ban Waterfall Hike Cape Breton
Uisge Ban Waterfall Hike

Just outside of Baddeck is one of the most pleasant hikes we took during our drive. The Uisge Ban (pronounced Ishkaban) hike is an easy 1 1/2 km stroll to a beautiful waterfall. It goes through a mossy forest meandering along a running stream.

Roots stick out of the ground twisting around fallen tree trunks and rocks create small rapids in the running water.

Watch our Uisge Ban Waterfall Hike

uisge ban waterfall hike

The waterfall itself is beautiful. Its size surprised us. We were expecting a much smaller set of waterfalls, but it’s a tall three-tiered cascade where you can swim or soak in the bottom pools.

Many trees have grown over, blocking sight of the top and keeping it from being the ultimate photo stop, but for a day in nature, it’s wonderful. T

3. North River Kayaking

north river kayak drone shot
North River Kayaking

North River Kayak Tours is an excellent stop for all levels of kayaking. Located on the North River, your excursion starts in easy flowing water out to the bay where you’ll witness the Cape Breton Coast from a different view.

Expect to see several bald eagles flying overhead. We even saw a nest with babies sticking their heads out, waiting for mom to arrive.

Fresh tea and baked goods are served during a tea break on a picturesque beach where paddlers can take a short hike to another pretty waterfall.

Dave and I love kayaking, but I must say, this was one of the most pleasant kayaking excursions we’ve ever had.It was a relaxed, easy-going half-day excursion that offered beautiful views and great conversation.

4. Glenora Distillery

glenora distillery

Technically on the Cleideh Trail, The Glenora Distillery is still a great stop on your Cabot Trail Road trip. Glenora is the first single malt whisky distillery in North America. Tours occur daily to see how the whisky is made and there are tastings as well.

We bought a bottle to take home. It’s our favourite souvenir whenever we travel.

Read our favourite Canadian Road Trips.

5. Clucking Hen Cafe and Bakery

cabot trail moose
Lunch stop

A quirky bakery along the Cabot Trail between North River Kayaking and Ingonish Beach is the Clucking Hen Cafe and Bakery. It not only is a good stop for delicious coffee and pastries, it’s a fun photo opportunity.

There aren’t a lot of lunch stops along this route of the Cabot Trail, so be sure to bring some snacks and plenty of water. But make sure to stop and enjoy the few cafés along the way, the best part of the Cabot Trail drive is meeting the people.

The people of Nova Scotia remind us a lot of the people of Ireland. They are so friendly and open, you’ll end up having conversations with everyone you meet.

6. Ingonish Beach

rock beach in Cape Breton Nova Scotia
Ingonish Beach

The excitement of the Cabot Trail really begins once you reach Ingonish Beach, located in Cape Breton Highlands National Park. This is a great place to make a base for a day or two as the beach is beautiful and there are plenty of hikes in the area.

Plus, there are excursions, boat tours, and kayak rentals. A corner store is located about 10 km away from Igonish Beach where you can stock up on supplies,

7. Glamping at Ingonish Beach

glamping on the cabot trail canada
The Parks Canada Otentik in Cape Breton National Park

We booked two nights in an Otentik that was absolutely perfect. If you don’t have camping gear, the Otentik is the way to go.

These glamping style camps sleep up to eight people and are built on solid foundations offering room to walk around and even play cards at the wooden table inside.

All cooking and cleaning materials are supplied including a small camp stove, or you can use the barbecue out front. We love this style of camping. It’s a great introduction for those who aren’t keen on sleeping in a tent, but who want to try something rugged and new.

There are a few different campsites for the Otentik, we stayed in the Ingonish Beach camp which was a great location.

Pick up a copy of The Lonely Planet Nova Scotia to help you plan your trip. 

8. Lantern Walk

lantern hike cape ingonish beach
The Lantern Walk at Ingonish Beach

When staying near Ingonish Beach, be sure to go on the Lantern Walk. We were surprised just how much we enjoyed it!

Starting at dusk, the tour is run by Parks Canada and they put on a great show. It begins with your guide lighting lanterns for everyone that will direct your way as you walk through the forest.

There is a lot of history in these parts, and our guide told us of all the tales of the early settlers. There are plenty of ghost stories too. The mood is set with people chanting in the forest and shadows walking through the path.

We found this thoroughly entertaining and informative. It’s one of the most unique things you’ll ever do in a National Park!

9. Hike The Middle Head Trail

Middle head trail cabot trail cape breton
Hike the Middle Head Trail

If you drive through the Keltic Lodge (which we highly recommend staying at if you want to splurge or have it in your budget) you’ll find the entrance to the Middle Head Trail.

The 3.8 km route takes you through forests and fields leading out to high cliffs for beautiful views of Ingonish Beach to the right and the Cabot Trail winding north to the left along the Gulf of St. Lawrence. The walk takes about two hours and is well maintained.

Looking for Nova Scotia Adventures? Enjoy our time Tidal Bore Rafting on the World’s Highest Tides.

10. Lakies Head

Dave on rocks at Lakies Head

One of the most striking parts of the Cabot Trail is the rocky coast of Lakies Head. The shore is amass of rocky boulders where visitors can walk out to explore the coast. There’s a bridge and boardwalk that will take you out to a viewing platform and you can stop there.

amazing landscape of Lakies Head Nova Scotia

But half the fun for us was hopping over the rocks in search of that perfect tourist shot.

11. Zodiac Tours at the Pier

cabot trail fishing boats
Take a zodiac tour from a charming fishing village.

As you continue farther north you must take a turn onto Wharf Road of the Cabot Trail. This takes you out of Cape Breton highlands national National Park for a little bit, but it is a charming fishing village.

tours along the cabot trail

Here you’ll see that classic Canadian East Coast view of Cape Breton fishing boats lining the pier. Walk along the beach and if you are up for some excitement, you can take a zodiac tour to do some whale watching.

You can take whale watching tours and boat tours on the Cabot Trail to see the coast from a different perspective. See our zodiac tour of Antarctica 

12. White Point

white point hike nova scotia
Hike to White Point

Our next stop on the Cabot Trail took us to White Point, located outside the National Park. One of the most beautiful hiking trails on the Cabot Trail is the White Point Hiking Trail at Neil’s Harbour.

There are excellent hiking trails taking you out to overlook the high sea cliffs offering beautiful panoramic views.

13. Grave of the Unknown Sailor

grave of the unkown sailor cabot trail

Out on the point, there is a cemetery where you’ll encounter the grave of the unknown sailor paying tribute to the fisherman lost at sea.

The grave of the Unknown Sailor is marked by a wooden plaque and large cross. Beside the Unknown Sailor is the grave of Dan Dixon. When looking up who this man was, I found out that Dan hiked daily to Point Hill and took great pride in maintaining the cemetery of the unknown sailor.

14. Neil’s Harbour

neils harbour fishing village on cape breton island

Neil’s Harbour is a tiny fishing village with colourful fishing boats docked in the water. There are only 300 residents in the village but the population soars in the summer with people stoping along the Cabot Trail. There’s the Periwinkle cafe, the lighthouse ice cream parlour and whale tours leave here by zodiac.

If you haven’t seen it yet, check out the scenes of Nova Scotia featuring White Point in the video below to really get a sense of its beauty. watch our video here

15. Coffee a the Pumpkin Patch

pumpkin patch coffee located on the Cabot Trail Nova Scotia
Don’t forget to stop at the Pumpkin Patch for a coffee.

We had some of the best coffee on our entire trip at the Pumpkin Patch in town. Everything in the store is organic and the coffee is delicious, but the homemade fudge is to die for.

The owner even sells organic beauty products that you can buy online. Don’t miss stopping here to get a coffee to go (and to stock up on sweet treats). When driving in a counterclockwise direction, it is located between Red River and the Skyline Trail.

16. Pleasant Bay

pleasant bay nova scotia
Discover Pleasant Bay

Another stop off the Cabot Trail is the fishing village of Pleasant Bay. It was here that we met many friendly local fishermen who chatted with us as we took photographs and flew our drone over the spectacular coast.

There’s a great spot at the top of a hill located beside the parking lot where the fishermen hang out. You can sit on Muskoka Chairs (Adirondack chairs if you prefer) to take in the view. This might be a great spot to have a picnic lunch.

17. Mackenzie Mountain Look off

makenzie mountain lookout cabot trail

Mackenzie Mountain is another great lookout viewpoint. From the highlands plateau, the Mackenzie Mountain Lookout offers grogeous views of Pleasant Bay. If you didn’t have time to do any whale watching while touring the Cabot Trail, you can take you time to keep an eye out for minke whales and pilot whales migrating through here.

18. Skyline Trail

skyline trail cape breton
Sunset Hike – The Skyline Trail

It’s the moment you’ve all been waiting for. The Skyline Trail is the most famous stop on the Cabot Trail and with good reason.

This 7.5 km loop is one of the longer hikes on the trail, but it is very easy and the scenes are worth every minute. We hiked at sunset which is highly recommended.

sunset over ocean
The views from the Skyline Trail are epic.

The sunsets over the Gulf of St. Lawrence and the crowds are much lighter at this time of day. We saw about 10 other people on the boardwalk during our time on the Skyline Trail, but it is so spread out, we barely noticed them at all.

Skyline Walk Cabot Trail
Sun sets over the trail

There are several tiers for watching the sunset and if you really want some privacy, you can hike down further off the boardwalk to view the scenery from the tip of the trailhead on a narrow dirt trail.

19. French Mountain

viewpoints of Cabot Trail
Scenic Viewpoints from Veteran’s Monument

The Cabot Tail has some of the best scenic stops in Canada.  If you have the time, pay attention to road signs and stop at all the lookout points. This is the classic view of the Cabot Trail from the Veterans Monument half way down French Mountain when driving counterclockwise.

There are easy hikes into waterfalls and even easier hikes out to lookout points. There are so many stops along the Cabot Trail, you could easily take a week to explore them all.

We popped in at many of the turn-offs to take in the panoramic views of the Cabot Trail. Another popular view along the way is Cap Rouge exhibit.

20. Beaches of the Cabot Trail

scenic view on the Cabot Trail nova scotia
Visit rugged beaches

There are beautiful secluded beaches on the Cabot Trail. We stopped at one on our way to Cheticamp just after the Skyline Walk that makes for a gorgeous stroll and a perfect vantage point of the iconic winding road view of the Cabot Trail.

Stopping at the beaches along the Cabot Trail lets you see the scale of the massive sea cliffs and rolling hills. It’s rare to find beaches that are so pristine in this world.

Few people stop to take a look so you will often have them all to yourself. Or perhaps, it will be just you and an artist capturing the scene before their eyes.

The Best Beaches on the Cabot Trail are:

21. Epic Views

road trip Cabot Trail nova scotia
Road slicing through wilderness.

If you love taking road trips, you’ll love exploring the Cabot Trail of Cape Breton Island. The road winds through the Highland Plateau surrounded by green rolling hills. It is truly one beautiful view after another.

22. Cheticamp

cheticamp nova scotia

The Acadian Village of Cheticamp is a great base for hiking the skyline trail. It’s just 20 minutes from the trailhead. Make sure to visit the Elizabeth LeFort Gallery and Museum at Les Trois Pignons to see her rug hook portraits.

marjorie river island sun resort nova scotia

The Island Sun Resort is a great places to stay at the mouth of the Marjorie River. This is where you can also try your hand at fly fishing at the Margaree River. It is considered one of the most beautiful rivers in the world and was appointed as a heritage river.

deb eating nova scotia lobster

And end your day with fresh Nova Scotia Lobster. And once you’ve had lobster in Nova Scotia, your bucket list is complete.

And that my friends is a tour of Cape Breton Island’s Cabot Trail. Isn’t it amazing?

About the Cabot Trail

cabot trail eagle
We saw lots of Bald Eagles on the Cabot Trail.

While the Cabot Trail can be driven in one short day, we suggest 3-5 days to drive the Cabot Trail. There are so many things to see and do, you’ll really be missing out.

Driving it in a counter clockwise direction puts you on the outside lane offering better views of the coast. But the real views happen when you get out of the car.

Boook your accommodation in advance. It is even recommended to make a base for a day or two to explore and do day trips from your campsite or hotel.

What to Pack for the Cabot Trail

Pack extra water and snacks in advance. Surprisingly, there are not a lot of places to stop for food along the Cabot Trail.

Be sure to pack hiking boots. There are a lot of trails along the coast and you’d be missing out if you didn’t get out to explore them.

We suggest packing water-shoes for your Cape Breton trip. The shores can be rocky, but water shoes let you hop in and out of kayaks, wade in the shallow waters, and take short hikes inland.

Accommodation along the Cabot Trail:

skyline trail home
Island Sunset Inn in Margaree Harbour

Map of the Cabot Trail, Canada

Click on the Interactive map for all the stops on the Cabot Trail that we mention.

Planning a Road Trip? Check out our list of the Best Songs to Get You Through the long Drive

best stops cabot trail
The best places to stop on the Cabot Trail

Have you driven the Cabot Trail? What is your favourite road trip in the world?

Our trip around the Cabot Trail was in partnership with  Nova Scotia Tourism who we went on assignment with to capture adventures and photography around Nova Scotia.

Find out more about traveling around Nova Scotia at VisitNovaScotia.com. All opinions are our own.

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About The Planet D

Dave Bouskill and Debra Corbeil are the owners and founders of The Planet D. After traveling to 115 countries, on all 7 continents over the past 13 years they have become one of the foremost experts in travel. Being recognized as top travel bloggers and influencers by the likes of Forbes Magazine, the Society of American Travel Writers and USA Today has allowed them to become leaders in their field.

Leave a Comment

25 thoughts on “22 Incredible Stops on the Cabot Trail in Nova Scotia”

  1. Dear Deb and Dave,
    Thank you so much for this great article about the Cabot Trail. We are heading to that area this fall and we would have missed planning it into our trip if I hadn’t read your article. I have a question for you, do you know if mountain bikes are allowed on the hiking trails? Also, we will be coming in October, do you know if the crowds will be less that time of year?
    Thanks so much!

    Reply
  2. The Cabot Trail is breathtaking. Everyone should take an extra few minutes to visit the villages off the trail. Neil’s Harbour, Dingall, Bay St. Lawrence, Meat cove, to name a few. All.places have wharves where fresh seafood is available, whale tours, accommodations, and eating establishments.

    Reply
  3. OMG did you guys hike Pollet’s Cove? It doesn’t look like it but next time you’re in NS you MUST – it’s the most amazing hike! It’s challenging yes but so worth it… with horses and (sometimes) cattle along the trail to distract you from the brutal climbs 😉

    Reply
  4. I have been to CApe Breton 4 times in the last 10 years. I live in Scotland with family in Prince Edward Island. Cape Breton – well the only way I can explain it is there is a surprise round every corner. It is the most beautiful place to visit and the people of Cape Breton are so friendly. I have been over for the Celtic Colours festival 3 times and this was a lifetime experience from watching concerts in Fire Service halls in the north to watching concerts in very large Community halls. Of course had to visit the GlenOra distillery which looks very Scottish.Ever time we have stayed there we were in The Silver DArt Lodge in Baddeck and this was so central for everywhere we went and we went on the boat trip from Baddeck Pier which was an amazing afternoon and were lucky enough to see the Bald EAgles.
    I loved to see all the small harbours on our journey through CB and it is well worth a visit and they saying is so true, if you visit there you will leave a bit of your heart there.

    Reply
  5. As a resident of Cape Breton Island, all around the Island is beautiful! Come visit us on the other side of the Cabot Trail, we have beautiful scenery, surfing, lovely restaurants, sailing and sailing curses on the Bras d’Or Lakes, beautiful beaches, accommodations, museums,walking trails, hiking, music, etc.. Check us out and come visit!!!

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  6. Thank you so much Dave and Deb for the beautiful pics and comments about our beautiful home Cape Breton!
    It was a pleasure to have you at the Pumpkin Patch Organic Shop!
    Hope to see you again!
    Trina

    Reply
  7. Great article, just a couple things for those who intend to do themselves a favour, and come here themeselves:
    1. Please do not leave the boardwalk on Skyline Trail – because of high winds this area is extremely prone to erosion, and going off the boardwalk destroys important vegetation that holds the little soil left where it is…be a responsible steward of the environment when hiking in order to preserve this beauty for future generations.

    2. If you go to Pleasant Bay, continue following the road through Red River Valley, and you will come to Gampo Abbey, a Buddhist Monestary. There are a few short hikes here, and they actually open the gardens and temples of the Monestary for public tours a few times every year.

    3. Pollett’s Cove – this is a very difficult hike, up and down two mountains before entering the beautiful Cove inhabited by a few horses and cows. It’s an incredible place to set up a tent on a grassy delta where 2 rivers converge, within earshot of the waves rolling into the shore. As a day hike, it may be rather difficult, as it takes 5-6 hours one way. This trail is part of the proposed multi-day backcountry SeaWall Trail system.

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  8. Hiking the Cabot Trail is a feast for the senses regardless if it’s a newbie or veteran hiker on the trail. Breathtaking does not even come close to the experience.

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  9. These places are awesome, they’ ve just cast a spell me. Everything is ideal. You’re the luckiest and happy couple, really appreciate you! But nature is like in the fairytale, I can’t believe my own eyes, coz these photos are stunning, meanwhile video about Nova Scotia is inimitable, I’ve even watched again the video, so like it’s very beautiful panorama.)

    Reply
  10. Wow! This looks so amazing, especially the spectacular views. Thanks for all the info! Will sure chec out the trail when in Canada. Happy travels you two 🙂

    Reply
  11. Having been to every part of Nova Scotia excepting Cape Breton,this place I have on my bucket list. Having ancestors who lived in Margaree,I know I have to do it. An Acadian ancestry got me interested close to 30 years ago. Hoping for next year to do some hiking there !!

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  12. We celebrated our 45th wedding anniversary this year and chose the Cabot Trail. I’ve always wanted to see it. We stayed at an inn in Baddeck and spent a good 4 days travelling right round the trail, including the south end of Inverness. Just loved the trip, all the good food – most every place has its own version of chowders, and we sampled them all. The scenery was beautiful and it really is not possible to really enjoy the trip in just 5 -6 hours. Every town and fishing village you come to you want to stop. Every turn and bend in the road you want to stop. It was the best trip ever and the people we met were all friendly and helpful. Loved it and your videos and pictures brought it all back for me. Well done.

    Reply
  13. Beautiful pictures of Cabot Trail! I would love to take as many photos of the place as possible if I were you. I especially love the photo of the coast and the mountain trails, its mesmerizing me alot.

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  14. Dave and Deb – thank you so much for your beautiful article. I try to explore our island each and every year and learn something different. I have not yet done the Lantern Walk in Ingonish nor the Middle Head Trail so they have both been added to my bucket list. I love that visitors like yourself open up new adventures for me to explore in my own backyard. Learning through the eyes of others makes each and every trip a new one for me each time I travel this beautiful island. Beinn Bhreagh, Alexander Bell’s home, is still in the possession of the Bell ancestors who live there at times throughout the year. It has been recently announced that the family has decided to open the home to the public as a national museum. Should you come back to the island and it’s open to the public it is worth a visit. I tried to post a pic for you however the post does not allow pics in the comment section. Google the home, it’s spectacular. Cheers, D

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  15. Actually Steve, Baddeck is part of the Cabot Trail and is often noted as both the start and finish of the trail and is included in all map routes. A little hostile there don’t you think….these people are guests to our island and have done a beautiful PERSONAL photo & video presentation of what they encountered on their trip and presented it well. They may have erroneously listed the odd tidbit but nothing to encourage your first statement “so inaccurate you couldn’t finish the article”. You did say Baddeck was not part of the trail after all – so – you know – we all make mistakes. On a lighter note we agree that you can do the trail in 5-6 hours depending on your start but you really need to get off the track and stop and explore. I try to take visitors to our island “around” the trail at least once or twice every year. What I often tell them is you need at least 3-5 days to do that area of the island justice and at least 10 days minimum for the island as a whole. If you haven’t finished the article have a second look and just enjoy…Cheers!

    Reply
  16. So inaccurate I didn’t bother finishing the article. 1. Baddeck (and its Inverary Inn) is not on the Cabit Trail, although it is near. 2. It takes 5-6 HOURS to drive around the trail, not 3-5 days, but if you have 3-5 days you’ll enjoy it more. 3. There are many places along the trail to stop and eat from small mom & pop convenience stores to bistros to restaurants (seasonal). What they did get right is that the trails and scenery are fantastic, and I don’t know if it was mentioned but the Cabot Trail is one of the best if not the best motorcycle ride in North America.

    Reply
    • Hi Steve, We said we started in the town of Baddeck. It is a great starting point before heading off around the trail. And we said, we continued from there in a counter clockwise direction. Sure you can drive anything in a few hours, but to actually see it, you should take 3-5 days. When we travel, we like to meet the people and enjoy the beauty. If people are going out to Nova Scotia, I doubt many are going to rush around such a beautiful drive as the Cabot Trail in 5 hours. And of course, naturally if you are going to drive something in a car, chances are you can also drive it on a motorcycle. I don’t think motorcycle enthusiasts need to be told that they can do it on a motorcycle.

      Reply
  17. Found a couple of places where me and my bike can certainly enjoy both the wonderful scenery and cycling. That waterfall shot is simply unreal, by the way!

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  18. wow, This leaves me astounded. Your Cabot Trail itinerary is worth reading for. I like that skyline trail photo of yours, the sunset is grand.

    Reply
  19. This looks stunning – beautiful photos! I’ve wanted to visit Canada for years, and I finally made it for just a few days on a recent road trip. I only travelled about 3 miles across the border from the US into British Columbia, so I’ve barely even scratched the surface, but it’s definitely given me a taste for the country and I can’t wait to go back to explore it some more. Will have to add the Cabot Trail to my ever-growing list! 🙂

    Reply
  20. Wow, great post and it looks absolutely amazing! I cannot wait for our tour de Canada (sadly it will be only next summer) and we must put Cabot Trail on the list!

    Reply